Homeowner informational pack – How to rent a spare room in your home

Welcome-Home

You want to rent out a spare room. 

Would you like to rent a spare room in your home but don’t know where to start? The usual process is to advertise your home on a property website. With the shortage of accommodation, you could be overwhelmed with applications. Another challenge is you don’t know much about the applicants, so how do you know who to trust?  Maybe you don’t feel comfortable inviting strangers to view your home.

 

HomeHak’s Tenant Selector allows homeowners to filter, sort, select and contact organised home seekers who could be happy in their home. Make an informed selection about who your property would suit best. If you do decide to advertise your spare room, ask for applicants to submit their HomeHak Tenant CVs so that you can filter, sort and select applicants in a consistent format in one place.

 

Once you have selected someone to view your home, there are many factors to consider and discuss with your potential new resident. This article prompts you to enquire about typical topics and what you may want to agree on at the beginning of any arrangement.

Important

This post focuses on an arrangement where an owner-occupier invites a home seeker to rent a room in their home. This is not considered the same as a landlord-tenant arrangement. Landlord and tenant legislation do not cover you, so the rights and obligations under that legislation do not apply to you. For example, you are not obliged to register as a landlord with the RTB. This also means that residents living in your home live under a licensee agreement, not a tenancy agreement, and are only entitled to reasonable notice if you terminate the arrangement.

 

In this article, we use the terms “homeowner” instead of “landlord” and “resident”, “lodger” or “home seeker” instead of “tenant”.

 

Welcome-Home
Photo by Andrew Neel on Unsplash

Selecting your resident – some considerations and discussion points

Once you have selected the home seekers and invited them to view your home, there are topics we recommend you discuss with your potential resident before selecting who will move in.

Furthermore, you can also establish a formal agreement between yourself as a homeowner and your future resident. There is an example template linked at the end of this article.

Duration and Nature of the Stay

Discuss the intended length of the accommodation period and whether or not that period could be extended. Enquire about their plans and how long they need accommodation.  You may have future commitments and need the room back after 6 or 12 months or at a certain date. It is fair to manage expectations so your resident can plan accordingly. Communicate openly about the availability of the room, as flexibility is often attractive to residents.

Damage Deposit

If you are operating a damage deposit system, be clear about the conditions relating to the deposit and provide the resident with a receipt. Make it clear that the damage deposit is not rent and will be returned at the end of the accommodation period if all goes well. If any damage does ever occur, discuss the situation immediately. This will be less awkward than introducing it as surprise news at the end of the accommodation period. Return the deposit if no damage has been caused on the resident’s departure.

Utilities

Give the resident sufficient information about the approximate cost of utility bills. Make special considerations for individual situations. If the resident will be working from home, they could maybe contribute a certain percentage of the electricity or gas bill to reflect the extra consumption.

 

Working-from-home
Photo by Annie Spratt on Unsplash

Rent Payment

Agree on the amount of rent, the day and frequency of payments, the method of payment, and to who it should be paid. Make it clear what is included in the “rent” and if utilities are included, for example. If there are situations when the rent can be increased or decreased in future, make these clear in advance.

Extra services

You may want to offer the resident extra services with the room, such as a secure parking space, cooked meals, laundry services, bed linen changes, etc. If you propose such and agree on additional services with your resident, make sure you factor in the cost of the services into the final agreed rent price for the room. Remember, if services are included in the rent, they must be delivered.

Common Areas

Outline which areas of the home may be considered common areas and which are off-limits to residents. . Generally, a resident would have access to the kitchen, living room, bathroom, back kitchen/utility room, and their bedroom. Still, every household varies, and if you prefer a resident to use a specific toilet, for example, that should be communicated.

Person in the living room with computer
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Time and consumption limits

Inform the resident of any time limits which may apply to the use of amenities such as the shower, the heating, the tumble dryer, etc. Most people can appreciate the rising cost of living, especially concerning utility bills. If you want to set consumption limits, make the residents aware before they move in to avoid potential disputes later.

Other Limitations

To rent a spare room in your home without incidents, you may want to discuss other limitations. For instance,  consider if there will be limitations on visitors, noise, hours of entering and leaving home, use of common areas, etc.

Expectations and Preferences

Discuss any personal expectations, pet peeves or preferences you have regarding your home. It could be related to anything from noise levels to security to cleanliness and so on. Every home and every person is different. If you are accustomed to doing things a certain way, it’s important to remember that people cannot read your mind! Open communication and setting reasonable boundaries early on will help to avoid any frustrations in the future.

Smoking

Many homeowners don’t allow smoking. However, if you permit smoking, discuss the rules for smoking at your home. Outline if there are designated areas, where to dispose of cigarette butts, where to empty ashtrays, etc.

Sharing of Household items

There may be some everyday products that you are comfortable with your resident using. If you are willing to share, we recommend creating a checklist of items to agree on, for example, milk, sugar, tea and coffee, toilet paper, kitchen towels, cleaning products, dish soap or dishwashing tablets, shower gel, shampoo, laundry detergent, etc. Discuss with the resident which common products they have permission to use and how such items will be bought. If certain products should not be shared, discuss these in  dvance.

 

Man-cooking-kitchen-at-home
Photo by Jason Briscoe on Unsplash

Scheduling use of common areas

Schedules can be helpful where multiple people are living in the home. Everyone has different day-to-day lives. It’s considerate and useful to compare schedules with the resident. If necessary, agree on times of use for the busiest areas of the house.  For example,  you might schedule the use of the kitchen for cooking meals or the use of the main bathroom for taking showers or baths. The goal is to ensure that everybody’s daily routine can run smoothly. Understanding everybody’s schedule from the start can also avoid disruption if, for example, you or your resident must work awkward shift patterns.

Keys

Discuss the resident’s responsibilities regarding holding keys to your home. Specify any conditions, e.g. don’t make copies or that there is a fee to replace lost keys.

Security

For many homeowners, knowing there is a trusted resident in the home offers added security. Demonstrate to the resident how to properly lock doors and windows and set alarms or any other security equipment in the home. Specify your expectations about locking up when the home is unoccupied or before bed. If you have other people nominated as keyholders for your home, such as neighbours, family members, or a security company, make sure your resident is also in the loop.

Household Services/Contracts

Explain any services you may have contracted related to the home and how the resident should handle them in your absence, e.g. refuse collection, signing for post & packages, allowing access to builders, childminders, window cleaners, etc.

Household Responsibilities

Discuss the sharing of household responsibilities with the resident. This might involve, for example, taking turns each week to clean the common areas of the home, watering the plants/garden or taking out the bins to be collected, etc. Discuss and outline the expectations in advance, so there is no confusion later.

Embracing differences

Maybe your resident comes from a different cultural or ethnic background? If so, it is considerate to gen up in advance so that you can ask thoughtful questions about cultural differences that might affect the experience for both of you. Ask the resident what a typical day in their life looks like. Enquire about food and eating habits, work or study hours. You will possibly discover more similarities than differences and more conveniences than issues. For example, if your resident is from Spain, they may like to cook dinner later in the evening, allowing you full use of the kitchen during Irish dinner time!

Pets

Disclose plenty of information about your pets to the resident in advance. Make sure to introduce your pet to the resident before they move in It is important to avoid issues with allergies or where a resident has a fear of animals. Before agreeing to a property viewing, disclose details like the type of pet, size, temperament, etc. Be clear about any expectations concerning your pet, like ensuring doors, gates and windows be kept shut.

Would like your resident to feed your pets sometimes or keep an eye on them while you are away? Would you be happy to recognise such services with a discount on rent? Mention such expectations in advance. If you agree with a resident that they can bring a pet to your home, obtain the same information about their pet.

 

Dog-owner-at-home
Photo by Evieanna Santiago on Unsplash

Special Requirements

Discuss with your resident if you, any other household member or the resident, have special requirements, such as a potential need for minor medical assistance. For example, if someone has a severe nut allergy, it would be a good idea to inform all household members where they can find Epi-Pen and how to administer it – just in case. Other conditions might include diabetes, epilepsy, low blood pressure etc.

Emergency numbers

In the event of an emergency, discuss with your resident what to do. Maybe you have an accessible list of phone numbers for local emergency services and family members or neighbours. For your resident, it might be a good idea to share contact details for a family member of theirs, a friend or their workplace in case of any unfortunate circumstance.

Notice period

Agree on a reasonable notice period for termination of the agreement in advance. People living in your home as residents are living under a licensee agreement, not a tenancy agreement, and are only entitled to reasonable notice if you choose to terminate the agreement. Should you require the resident to move out of your home, the process is more transparent if you can invoke a previously agreed-upon notice period.

For when your resident wants to leave, outline how your resident must communicate the notice (e.g. email or letter). State how long in advance they should advise you of the leaving date. Make it clear that you will return the damage deposit at the end of the final rent period if everything is satisfactory.  

Sample homeowner-resident agreement

Finally, if you rent a spare room in your home, consider having all the norms in writing. To make it easier, we have created this sample agreement (click here). Feel free to modify this sample agreement outlining living arrangements to your liking. Simply click on the option “File”, and then on “Make a copy” to edit this template.

 

Further reading

If you are considering the option of renting your spare room(s), we recommend you look at the article about benefits of renting a spare bedroom in your home.

Why employers should help their staff find a home

Employees-with-HR-person

Companies looking to hire new employees are significantly impacted by the housing crisis, according to the latest Morgan McKinley quarterly employment monitor: “The lack of housing supply in cities in addition to soaring costs is leading to a rise in emigration, further emptying the talent pool”.

 

Employers are struggling to keep native Irish talent due to the lack of supply in the Irish rental market. Besides, hiring international employees has become a highly complex task. Morgan McKinley’s report claims that “the housing shortage within Dublin is causing companies to struggle with securing overseas talent, leading to a reduction in non-EU professionals and a narrowing of the talent pool”.

 

Shortage of accommodation is not just a Dublin problem, as the figures speak about a nationwide accommodation crisis. According to the Renting and Risk report from the homeless charity Threshold and the Citizens Information Board, on August 1st this year, there were “just 716 homes available to rent in the State in comparison with an average of 9,300 at any one time in the years between 2006 and 2019”.

 

Employees-with-HR-person
Photo by Christina @ wocintechchat.com on Unsplash

The impact of Ireland’s accommodation crisis on the workforce

 

Ireland’s housing crisis, coupled with the requirement for many employees to return to the workplace and live in or close to the cities after working remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic, raises the following questions: Are companies doing enough to support their staff to find accommodation? Should employers help their staff find a home?

 

The general support employers provide to new hires relocating to Ireland is to cover the expenses of the trip and several weeks in either a hotel or a room rented from temporary housing providers. However, the problem comes when the employee must leave their provisional home without finding a longer term home.

 

The prospect of lacking something as fundamental as a place to live generates enormous stress for the employee, especially when they are in a foreign country. Unsurprisingly, absenteeism, disengagement, a decrease in productivity and, in some cases, resignation are the most common consequences.

 

According to the Irish company Excel Recruitment, the real cost of employee turnover can range from 33% to a stunning 200% of an employee’s annual income, depending on the complexity and seniority of a role.
The high cost of finding and replacing talent and the hit to productivity are strong enough reasons. This encourages some employers to have a more proactive role in supporting their staff to find a home.

Employers who help their staff find a home will see an increase in productivity

Available and affordable accommodation that fits the needs of the workforce is crucial to attract, keep and grow a skilled and productive workforce. Businesses should advocate and invest in finding suitable housing for their staff, not only to assist their employees but also the local economy.

 

Employees that live in the area near their workplace will have shorter commute times and, therefore, a better quality of life. Long commutes may not only push them to look for another job but also affect their wellbeing and productivity. A Britain’s Healthiest Workplace study carried out with 34,000 workers revealed that those who commute over an hour to go to work are more likely to experience stress, health issues such as obesity and depression, and financial concerns. The study also found that employees commuting less than 30 minutes per day “gain an additional seven days’ worth of productive time each year compared to those with commutes of 60 minutes or more”.

 

The relationship between homes and wellbeing 

This type of data is relevant for Irish employers. As revealed in an Aon survey, ‘work-life’ balance is their top wellbeing concern. Besides, this research also states that “96% of businesses in Ireland have at least one employee wellbeing initiative in place”. This figure is especially high when compared to the average of 86% in European firms.

 

Another piece of research carried out by The Happiness Research Institute, Kingfisher and B&Q shows the impact of accommodation on overall happiness and wellbeing by stating that a home contributes more to happiness than a job or a salary. The findings, gathered from over 13,000 people across Europe, showed that while a happy home accounts for 15% of a person’s total happiness, only 6% and 3% of happiness is based on what we earn and the job we do, respectively. This 2019 survey also unveiled that 73% of people who are happy at home are also content in life.

The link between happiness and the home

Support that goes beyond paying the hotel bill

Employers that don’t help their staff find a home will feel the consequences of an unhappy and disengaged workforce. An unpleasant experience in a new city will make any employee less likely to stay in the company. This could also harm the brand’s reputation.

 

Employee experience begins way before starting the new job.  The Recruitment teams should  set the right expectations about the moving process. A prior-first-day orientation to the new hire should help alleviate the relocation stress. For example, the welcoming package could include a local guide. This resource should incorporate information about public transport and recommendations for local services such as grocery shops, hospitals or gyms. This will help international workers know where they would like to live before getting started with their home search.

 

Employers can create opportunities for their staff to connect and help each other with their house hunting. Getting co-workers to network “reduces the likelihood of turnover by 140%”, increases productivity and, in this particular case, it could help employees find a house through their professional connections.

 

Households formed by like-minded people, such as employees of the same company, are more likely to have good chemistry than those where complete strangers cohabit. Employees who live near or with each other will also enjoy spontaneous get-togethers. This can also enhance the employee experience overall. When employees live together, they can commute to work in groups and share the cost of transportation.

 

Happy talent is productive talent. Hence, the company would ultimately benefit from these types of living arrangements between team members.

 

Girls-at-home-with-dog-laughing
Photo by Chewy on Unsplash

 

The company’s duty of care

Another reason a company should support their workers in finding a home is that they owe it to their staff. Under the Safety, Health and Welfare at Work Act 2005 the standard duty of care places an obligation on the businesses to do everything that “is reasonably practicable” to protect the health, safety and welfare at work of all employees.

 

Employers are also morally obliged to protect their employees from undue risks when they relocate. Therefore, they should make every effort to protect employees travelling and relocating to a new city for business purposes from any physical or psychological harm.

 

By safeguarding their employees and preventing them from experiencing distressing situations such as not having a place to live, the company will also protect its own image and reputation.

 

Businesses can execute their duty of care by guiding their relocated employees. They should help them avoid accommodation scams, choose safe neighbourhoods for housing, and find reliable and convenient commuting options.

 

The social contract: why employers should help their staff find a home

The social contract between employers and employees has long been established and should not be forgotten. Employers provide stability and fair compensation in exchange for their employee’s dedication, hard work, and skills. Since finding housing is a necessary component of stability, employers should become powerful allies in their staff’s housing search. This behaviour will also help strengthen the relationship between employers and employees, turning them into advocates of the company.

 

All things considered, it seems logical for employers to build as much housing support into the recruitment process as possible. Employers should help their staff find a home and navigate the complicated Irish home market.

References:

  1. The housing crisis is making Ireland’s skills shortage worse, a new report reveals.
  2. Housing Crisis Threatening Job Growth as Vacancies Up 6.9%.
  3. Collapse in number of properties on rental market since pandemic laid bare in new report.
  4. The True Cost of Replacing an Employee. [online] Excel Recruitment.
  5. Long commutes costing firms a week’s worth of staff productivity
  6. Aon survey reveals ‘work-life’ balance is the top wellbeing concern for Irish employers
  7. What makes a happy home?
  8. Networking Statistics: General Stats, Benefits, Face to Face, and More!
  9. Duty of Care

The 7 Benefits of Renting a Room in Your Home

Woman-at-home

If you are reading this, you have probably considered or have some experience renting a room in your home. Did you know that Eurostat figures confirmed that Ireland had the third-highest share of people living in under-occupied dwellings in the European Union in 2019? That means that we have more spare rooms than most EU countries. Despite this fact and a recent increase in residential construction, the reported housing shortages in 2019 in Ireland were estimated to range between 32,000 and 50,000 units.

 

While some people may be understandably sceptical about opening their homes to new people, platforms like HomeHak.com are here to relieve the apprehension by offering a solution where landlords can choose a resident for their home by utilising HomeHak Tenant Selector’s detailed filtering system.

 

Woman-at-home
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Gain access to a pool of pre-qualified tenants with HomeHak

Using the HomeHak platform, tenants can take a number of steps to make their Tenant CV desirable to homeowners, landlords and agents seeking to fill available accommodation without the overwhelming response of posting the listing on a public platform. In addition, tenants can verify their ID using Stripe, and invite ID-verified users to write references on their behalf. They can also display rental history, employment history and their available budget.

 

Therefore, you can easily identify candidates who fall into the price range you are expecting for the rooms you are offering. Renting a spare room in your home is now much easier and safer!

 

Here are some of the many benefits of using HomeHak.com to find a tenant for your home:

1. Earn extra income & split the cost of living

The number one reason people around the world rent rooms in their homes is to earn extra cash! You can also save more money by sharing the cost of living with tenants. The Rent-a-Room Relief scheme provides an incentive to homeowners in Ireland who want to rent a room in the house that they occupy as the main resident. Essentially, it is available to live-in landlords. Those benefiting from the scheme can earn up to €14,000 in a single tax year, exempt from income tax, PRSI, and USI. Besides, if you decide to sell your home, the scheme will not affect your capital gains tax.

 

Supplementing your income by renting a room in your home could potentially allow you more freedom. You might choose to work less, take more holidays, pay off debts, grow your savings and more with the extra income.

2. Provide much-needed accommodation for frontline workers and students  

Nurses and other health care providers are frequently travelling inter-county or from overseas to work in hospitals and care facilities in Ireland. Some have faced huge difficulties securing adequate housing in the vicinity of their workplaces.

 

Similarly, students returning to university in September have also been challenged with finding a place to call home for the academic year. Some students are seeking part weekly basis accommodation, which may be a good fit for homeowners who like the idea of renting a room but would also like to have the house to themselves or some family time at the weekend. HomeHak’s Tenant Selector can help to identify students from local universities or staff from local hospitals who may be in need of a home in your area.

 

Doctors-in-a-hospital
Photo by Luis Melendez on Unsplash

3. Exchange friendship, culture, food and language

People from all over the world have created their Tenant CVs and are looking for places to live on HomeHak. Would you like to learn about new cultures, and foods or learning a new language? Hosting an international resident at your home could be an exciting opportunity! This may allow you to have an immersive experience and meaningful connection with interesting new people.

4. Benefit from the extra security, especially for those living alone

You’ve probably heard the old saying “There’s safety in numbers”. Having an extra person at home will provide you with extra security should you ever be unlucky enough to be a target or victim of a crime or have an accident in your home. You may also feel more at ease when on vacation or on a work trip, knowing that someone is at home taking care of your house. Your residents might even take care of your pets and plants while you’re not home!

5. Combat isolation in older adults

With an ever ageing population, there has been an increasing number of older adults who live alone in Ireland. According to the Loneliness, social isolation, and their discordance among older adults findings from The Irish Longitudinal Study on ageing older adults who lived alone had a higher risk of social isolation than those who lived with others. The study also notes: “Loneliness and social isolation are not a necessary fact of the ageing process and recent efforts to alleviate these potentially damaging phenomena should be encouraged.”

 

Matching the numerous individuals in need of accommodation with older adults who live alone, such as empty nesters whose children have grown up and moved out, could provide a strong and effective relief to the social isolation often experienced by the demographic.

6. Get some extra help around the house

Some residents may have special skills they can offer you. For example, they could be qualified landscape gardeners, chefs or professional care providers. Suppose they are open to carrying out some tasks you have available in the home. In that case, you could propose a once-off or ongoing reciprocal agreement. For example, a reduction in the cost of rent in exchange for specified services provided in the home.

 

Man-and-woman-cooking-in-the-kitchen
Photo by Becca Tapert on Unsplash

7. Set out your own terms – Your house rules apply

Since you are the owner of the home, you can set out any rules/guidelines and precedent between yourself and the resident in the form of a written agreement prior to them moving into your home. Deposits, rent, and conditions can all be defined by you as the landlord. Spend some time considering what conditions might be important to you and your lifestyle or living situation. After that, craft an agreement around your needs. This will ensure you find a tenant who is a great fit and agrees to uphold the agreement you propose in exchange for the accommodation provided.

 

Of course, there are also various drawbacks to renting a room in your home. New relationships can be tricky to navigate, and you might not be accustomed to sharing your personal space with others. If you are receiving benefits you should check how the extra income could affect your entitlements.

 

Being a landlord may not be the perfect solution for everyone’s unique situation. However, if you have an urge to rent a room in your home, have good communication skills and are open to new experiences it could be the perfect opportunity to earn substantial extra income with a small amount of work contributed compared to if you were to earn the money at work.

 

Sign up to rent your spare room/son HomeHak today and select a tenant for your home.

Co-Applicants Feature – The best way to find a Ready-Made Household

Friends at home laughing

Unique to HomeHak is that individual home-seekers can join their tenant CVs to form ready-made households. Imagine knowing up front that all information for four housemates is organised and ready to view!

 

Since the home-seekers know each other, they probably have good chemistry and are likely to get on well in the home. It will likely mean less hassle and easier property management.

 

Learn more about one of the most beneficial features of our platform and the several practical use cases it offers for landlords and agents.

 

Introduction

 

Our mission is to help home seekers secure homes they like and, at the same time, help landlords and agents find trustworthy tenants. By succeeding, we will help create happy households that are more likely to treat a property like their home. Consequently, they will probably look after it better and want to stay longer.

 

Happy tenants will also likely be lower maintenance tenants for the property manager, which helps margins. Check out this article about the importance of having happy tenants.

 

Family at home
Photo by Dahiana Waszaj on Unsplash

 

How does HomeHak’s Co-Applicants feature work?

Home seekers with similar needs or interests, such as students in the same course, people in the same profession, or those who work in the same area can join their Tenant CVs and present as co-applicants for a property, forming a ready-made household.

 

The co-applicants feature allows agents and landlords to quickly see what ready-made households are listed on our tenant selector. It ensures a happier household, and makes life easier for the landlord and agent.

 

Have a look at Hanna and her friends’ Tenant CV here!

 

Understanding what tenants want

To satisfy home-seekers needs, you first need to understand what they want. With HomeHak, they have the opportunity to outline what they would like upfront, which enables better matching with each rental property.

 

Sometimes, when you advertise a multi-tenant property on a property website, you receive 400 applications and don’t know who to invite or group together in a household.

 

Instead of:

  • Selecting the fastest people to apply to the ad, or the most persistent callers on the phone. Neither criterion identifies the person most suited to the property.
  • Spending time and resources administering, receiving, analysing, filtering and responding to unsuccessful applicants (99% for most properties).

 

HomeHak’s Co-Applicants Feature allows you to:

  • Request applicants in your property ad to create their individual HomeHak Tenant CVs. You will be able to verify their IDs, unique renting history, employer details and character references separately.
  • Request applicants in your property ad who want to live together to join their HomeHak Tenant CVs as Co-applicants. This is a simple process involving a few clicks.
  • Later, when you review any one of the applicant’s HomeHak Tenant CVs, you can also see details for the other co-applicants on the Tenant CVs.

Lastly, check out this article about the benefits of requesting Tenant CVs to find great tenants.

 

Who Can Be A Personal Reference On Your Rental Application?

Your rental application is the ticket to your ideal home. One of the most important stages of the application process happens during your reference checks. For this reason, it’s important to select those references carefully. Read our guide to find out who can be a personal reference on your rental application.

 

Personal references can be hard to come by, especially when you’re already overwhelmed putting the rest of a rental application together. When you’re in a competitive rental market, it’s important to provide the most impressive references possible. Professionalism is key when choosing who will write your references and how many references you include with your application. 

 

Understanding the landlord screening process

One thing to keep in mind when trying to choose your references is the screening process that landlords will go through. A property manager typically does background checks on your income and rental history. This is done to ensure that landlords can trust you, so they can be confident that you’ll be the right tenant for their property! To learn more about what information a landlord can request as part of your rental application, check out this handy guide from Threshold. 

 

They’re looking for certain things during this evaluation like credit history, criminal record, reports of bad behaviour etc. If they can, they will likely contact your references and ask them how they know you, what you’re like, and how reliable you are. As such it’s important to put careful thought into choosing your personal references for your rental application. 

 

 

How to source your references

You should look to find people who know you well enough to speak to your character. Think of the people in your life who could vouch for your personal, financial, and professional reputation.  

At this point, you may already have a few people in mind, but be wary of what kind of answers you might get from them. Reflect on your relationship with these people and consider how they would speak about you in terms of your professionalism, your timeliness, and behaviour. 

 

Choose your references wisely

It’s common for a landlord/agent to ask for a minimum of two rental references, but don’t let that put you off. The reason they do this is so they can verify from an independent third party that you’re genuine and trustworthy.  The ideal references will be able to express your characteristics and qualities in a positive way so that the landlord has faith in you. 

 

Before you go putting everyone you know on your Tenant CV, you first need to work out if they will actually provide you with a reference, and secondly, that what they have to say actually helps your situation. 

 

You don’t want to select someone who might have something negative to say. Bear in mind they may not want to be contacted by anyone. Best practice is to reach out and discuss their feelings on the matter first! Written references are widely accepted, but it helps to have a few contact details available just in case.

 

Who Can Be A Personal Reference On Your Rental Application?

 

Previous landlord – This is probably the best reference to have (if you’ve had a good experience with them of course!) Having a former landlord’s reference on your Tenant CV will immediately catch a property manager’s eye.

 

An employer –  that knows you well and can speak highly of your work ethic, accountability, and attitude is an excellent reference. In most cases, your employer is someone who has worked with you for a long time. What they have to say about you professionally is valuable!

 

Co-workers/ career mentors – also considered great references. Again, someone who knows you professionally who speaks positively about your attitudes and behaviour. 

 

Volunteer Supervisor – A volunteer supervisor who has worked with you can provide you with a vote of confidence in terms of your hard work and diligence.

 

Friends/Family – it can sometimes be thought that a family member or friends aren’t useful references but this isn’t always the case.  Don’t worry if you don’t have a tenancy history. You can compensate by adding a few people you know who can provide a positive character reference. Someone who speaks highly of you can be more valuable than just saying ‘they can pay rent on time’. 

Honesty is the best policy

If you haven’t got the best credit history or if there’s another peculiarity that you think will be revealed during the screening process, the best thing to do is be upfront and honest. Everyone has a different story! A Tenant CV is a great way to explain how great of a tenant you are. 

 

However, if you’re worried about anything (i.e., rental arrears, damages) be prepared to discuss these with the property manager. Put your best foot forward and let them know the steps you’re taking to improve upon your history. 

 

The addition of personal references instantly elevates your rental application, but always go with your gut. When considering your options reflect carefully about who can be the best personal reference on your rental application. Choose people who you can trust! 

 

HomeHak Tenant CV

HomeHak provides the tools to easily include references on a beautiful Tenant CV. A Tenant CV is a document that showcases your attributes and interests when looking for a home. The idea is to build a Tenant CV once and use it as often as you need! The step-by-step process couldn’t be simpler, and it has a lot of benefits!

Check out how you can start building a Tenant CV here

First-Time Renters: What To Know Before You Rent

Move-In Day: HomeHaks Top Tips On Ways To Help Your New Tenants

Moving out of home is one of the biggest life changes you’ll ever experience. It’s stressful, exciting and can be overwhelming at times.

 

First-Time Renters: What To Know Before You Rent
Photo by K. Mitch Hodge on Unsplash

We’ve all heard horror stories about first time renters making mistakes that cost them dearly. Whether it’s not having a good understanding of your rights as a tenant or falling prey to scam rental advertisers looking to make a quick buck, there are plenty of pitfalls waiting for you!

That’s where our tips come in handy. Moving out involves a lot of organisation, especially for first-time renters. We will walk you through everything from finding the right place to live, how to manage finances and what to watch out for when signing a contract.

 

LOCATION

Location, location. Where you want to live, work, or study has a big impact on your location preferences for the rental search process.

When thinking about where to live, don’t just focus on the things you need in an apartment or house; think about what’s around too and how that may impact your commute time. Is there public transportation or cycle routes nearby? How far away are the supermarkets and services? What kind of gym options do locals have at their disposal? These are important questions since they can totally change how much fun living there would be day after day!

Rent Cost

You may already have an idea of how much you would like to spend on rent. There is a general rule of thumb to spend 30% of your annual income on rent. That said, it’s not entirely applicable to everyone. For example, someone who earns €100,000 may not want to spend €30,000 on their rent. Similarly, if you are on a lower salary it might not be feasible to put 30% of that towards rent. Analyse your financial situation for starters, and ask yourself what you can afford. It also doesn’t hurt to compare rent prices with your friends. See what they put towards rent and use that as a guide!

 

Budgeting

When preparing to rent for the first time, it’s important to embrace the concept of budgeting ASAP. It’s unavoidable, but in the long run it’s the best thing we can do to feel financially secure! Setting up a budget is essential for any tenant. Make a list of monthly expenses/regular bills and set aside a personal allowance. This may be the first time that you’re paying the bills yourself, so it’s important to know what they will cost ahead of time to save yourself any worry. Using a rent/ budget calculator is a great way to start figuring out your expenses.

 

Gas, Electricity & Bin Collection

Gas/electricity should come as no surprise since these things exist in every home. Depending on the setup, you may need to register the bin collection unless the landlord has done it for you. If you have no idea what the bills are going to be like, try getting an estimate on sites like Bonkers.ie which compares different suppliers’ rates. These utilities are then shared between all housemates in the house, sometimes monthly or every other month. You can also ask your friends/family what they usually 

 

Broadband

Other necessities may include broadband internet service, especially if you’re now working from home! Sometimes broadband may require installation at an additional fee depending on the supplier and/or location restrictions. When choosing how much broadband you’ll need, take into account how many people will be using it. Some areas cannot support every provider, which may affect your budget plan. Talk this over with your landlord if possible – they might already know about some hidden costs or previous issues! 

Reading the Contract

You may be racing to put your name on the dotted line, but it’s essential that you read through your contract carefully before signing anything. One thing to keep an eye out for is what type of tenancy agreement you are committing to. It will normally be a fixed-term tenancy or a periodic tenancy. Fixed-term, as the name suggests, refers to a fixed period usually about 6-12 months minimum. A periodic tenancy does not have a fixed length of time. There is lots of information about these agreements which can be read about in detail here.

First-Time Renters: What To Know Before You Rent
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RTB

 

In Ireland, all private residential properties must be registered with the RTB. The Residential Tenancies Board provides a dispute resolution service to protect both landlords and tenants. They provide “high-quality information and assistance to the public, tenants and landlords on their rights and responsibilities“. It’s advised that first-time renters check that their property has been registered so that your rights are protected. 

 

Pet Policies

 

Depending on the property, it may or may not be permitted to bring pets on site. If you don’t come across any explicit pet policies, just ask the landlord what their feelings are about it!

 

Applying Without a Rental History

 

Don’t let a lack of a rental history hold you back. Everyone has to start out somewhere! First-time renters can still include character references as part of their application. This helps to establish how reliable you are, and how you will treat another person’s property! Find references from people willing to vouch for you such as previous employers, colleagues, even school principals! The idea is to find someone who knows you well and will speak highly of you.

 

HomeHak Services for first-time renters

 

Moving out for first-time renters is an exciting adventure, and soon you’ll be obsessing over how to decorate and fill it to make it your own. With a bit of self-determination and positive action you will absolutely find something you love! To do this you just need to express to the landlord that you would be the perfect tenant, i.e., someone reliable, responsible, and punctual.

 

Homehak, a tool for tenants and landlords alike, is a great way to express these traits. With Homehak’s help you can create a Tenant CV that contains all the information a landlord would ever need from you, so they don’t have to search around themselves or get short on time. This makes life easier not only for landlords but also applicants who are trying their best to impress them!

What is a Tenant CV?

tenant-cv-rental-application-new-home

Your move to a new home involves so many important activities that all count towards your success, and it’s not always so obvious how time-consuming each activity is.

 

You find yourself scouring through property ads, applying for as many as possible with the same cut and paste story, chasing for responses and hoping to hear something good.

 

There are tons of documents to get together for the rental application: references, ID verification, salary/banking documents. It can take a lot of time to get it all prepared.

 

You take time off work to go to viewings, organise housemates, prepare to pay a deposit and rent in advance, go through security checks – all before you’ve even got a solid offer!

 

Searching for a home
Photo by Christin Hume on Unsplash

 

Basically, searching for your next home involves a lot more than checking property websites ten times every day and resending the same message over and over again.

 

In a competitive rental marketplace there may be thousands of views on just one ad, so you can imagine what the landlord or property manager’s inbox looks like with hundreds of enquiries.

 

The ideal situation is to stand out from the crowd, being selected for the home you want. Whether you’re an experienced renter or a first-timer, the best advice for you to take on board is to be exceptionally organised – and a really great way to help you do that is to prepare a Tenant CV in advance of your search.

What is a Tenant CV?

A Tenant CV works in the same way as your standard CV, but instead of searching for employment opportunities you’re searching for your dream home. It’s an easy-to-read document that shows off information a landlord would need to know. For example who you are, what kind of accommodation you’re looking for, as well as any amenities you might need.

The idea is to create a Tenant CV once and then share it directly with  landlords/agencies, which takes some frustration out of the process for you! 

What difference will a Tenant CV make?

Using a Tenant CV not only makes your own life easier, but it also offers some relief to the landlord. Imagine it from their perspective. Sifting through hundreds of emails from eager applicants, trying to find the right fit.  Completing a rental application with a beautifully formatted and detailed Tenant CV straight away lets the landlord see what you’re all about and that you have all the important documents organised, meaning you can both avoid having to go through a tedious back-and-forth email conversation and get straight to the point. 

Starting out

When you start building your profile, the important thing is to focus on you and what you want! The Good Home Report has found that 73% of people who are happy with their home are also happy in general. You shouldn’t have to sacrifice your happiness when it comes to the place you live, work, and relax. If you’re not satisfied with your rented home, you’re more than likely going to end up back at square one. Back on the property ad sites trying to find something you actually like. 

 

So when you’re creating a Tenant CV, be as specific as possible when describing your ideal living arrangement. Even if that sounds ambitious, including more detail will bring you one step closer to finding your dream home. Doing this helps potential landlords realise that you would be perfect for their property, that you would look after it, and ideally stay for a long time!

What kind of information will be a part of the Tenant CV?

The best Tenant CV’s for a rental application include:

    • A little bit about you – who you are and what you’re looking for!
    • Your tenancy history – landlords will look for any tenancy history so they can establish your character and trustworthiness
    • Your employment history – this lets the landlord know you’re capable of paying the rent
    • What you’re looking for – indicate your preferred house type, commute options, amenities and qualities (i.e., garden or en-suite etc.)
    • References – Real people who can give you a vote of confidence and are happy to be contacted
    • Optional verification information. – You may be asked for photo ID (passport/ driver’s license)

These are all the kind of things a landlord will ask you for at some point in the application process. Showing them that you’re already prepared will be a pleasant surprise! The biggest take-away from this list is that sharing all of this information serves a purpose. It’s a way to form a solid foundation between you and potential landlords from the outset. 

agent giving keys to tenant

I’ve made my tenant CV, what happens next?

That’s great! Now the fun begins. When a CV status reaches strength level of ‘good’ or higher it’s ready to be shared with landlords and agencies. Users also have the option to share it with a rental application via email, WhatsApp and more. Your information is accessible only by you until you choose for your profile to be visible within the database.

 

HomeHak allows you to store your Tenant CV information securely so you can start the application process with confidence. If the time comes for you to start looking for a new home, don’t worry. Just update your profile with any new preferences and attach it to your next application – simple!

 

Have a look at the 6 reasons to use a Tenant CV and get started today!

 

 

 

International Students Coming to Ireland – Everything you Need to Know

International Students Coming to Ireland:  Everything you Need to Know

Where do they come from?

The biggest increase has been international students from other EU states, jumping from 1,934 in 2017 to 6,383 in 2022.

 

According to the Irish Times, the total number of full-time, non-EEA international students reached nearly 18,500 in 2018. The Irish Higher Education Authority (HEA) states that the main non-EEA sending countries for Ireland are the United States, China, Saudi Arabia, Malaysia and Canada. Asia sends the largest share of students (43% as of 2017/18), followed by North America (30%), and the EU (20%). 

 

As reported by this report, applications from British students increased by 9 per cent this year. In 2021, Ireland was home to 25,000 international students. India is the second-biggest source of international students on the island. 

 

International Students Coming to Ireland:  Everything you Need to Know
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Top tips for International Students arriving to Ireland

Rental scams

September has approached, and students are heading back to college. The rental market has never been busier. With the surge in demand for accommodation, hopeful tenants are being advised to be cautious of a variety of rental scams.  HomeHak has put together some useful information about scams related to renting.

Bank account

One of the first things you should do is open a student bank account. Each university usually has a banking partner on campus.

Budgeting for international students

To enable you to enjoy your university experience to the fullest, you need to learn to manage your money correctly. One of the biggest ways to save money in university is through your grocery shopping. As an international student in Ireland, you can enjoy a range of great discounts and savings. These will make your finances easier to manage. 

Shopping and discounts

Ireland has several student discount cards. They range from freebies to money off. Below, we list the cards we recommend adding to your student wallet.

 

  • iConnect Card – You can save up to €450 on MacBook iPad ranges with a valid third-level student card.
  • ISIC Card – ISIC has been the mainstay discount card for international students for over 50 years. They offer exclusive discounts on a vast range of products and services in over 125 countries.

Affordable Supermarkets

Grocery shopping will eat up a large part of your student budget. It pays to shop around to find the cheapest supermarket in your local area. Here, we list the supermarkets that are the cheapest. 

 

Manage your time

As you settle into the swing of things, your time in Ireland is going to fly by. Plan Your Next Adventure with Discover Ireland.

Ireland’s Weather

Ireland is the type of place where you can experience the four seasons in one day. Ensure to pack wisely for cold, warm and wet days.

HomeHak International students
Photo by Erik Witsoe on Unsplash

Student Travel Card

A student travel card will get you discounts on your travel throughout Ireland. Also, giving you great savings is the Student Leap Card. 

For more information on these tips, check out our article International Students Studying in Irish Universities Top Tips.

Embassies 

Full details of all Diplomatic Missions in Ireland or accredited to Ireland on a non-resident basis can be found in the link below. This has been issued by the Department of Foreign Affairs. It includes information on the index of missions and representations accredited to Ireland. Diplomatic List July 2022

Irish Banks

To open an Irish bank account as an international student, you will need:

  • Valid passport/ID card
  • Certificate of Attendance 

These are Bank of Ireland, Allied Irish Banks and Ulster Bank. Each offers a student account with differing service fees and added extras. 

Mobile phone

Ireland has a reliable phone network. The country is covered by several major network providers. There are a number of options available to you, depending on your budget and requirements. These include a fixed-term contract, sim-only plan or pay-as-you-go tariff.

 

The main operators we’d recommend in Ireland are 

Healthcare

The INIS visa service offers information on the process of finding health insurance in Ireland. On average, health insurance for international students costs around €100 – €120 per annum.

Working in Ireland

Here are the conditions you need to be aware of:

EU Students

  • If you’re travelling from the EU, you can work in Ireland without registering for a GNIB card.

Non-EU Students

  • Non-EU students can seek casual work of up to 20 hours a week during term-time, provided they have a cardIn June, July, August and September, non-EU students can work up to 40 hours per week.
  • You cannot work in Ireland if your course is under six months in length.

Start with the university careers portal. These list a range of term-time positions available on and off campus. Then, check job sites such as Monster, Jobs and Irish Jobs. Distribute your CV to local businesses, as not all positions are advertised online.

 

Why use a Tenant CV?

  1. It’s an easy-to-read document.
  2. HomeHak tenant CV shows off information a landlord would need to know.  Head to our article What is a Tenant CV? for more information.
  3. It promotes you as a suitable tenant.
  4. A tenant CV takes some frustration out of the rental application process.
  5. It provides all valuable and essential information for the homeowner upfront. Check out our article on 6 Reasons to Use a Tenant CV. 

Landlord References

A landlord recommendation letter (rental reference) is an crucial component of your rental application. In a competitive rental market, a good reference can make a huge difference. Check out our article Importance Of a Reference for Irish University Student Accommodation.

Important links for international students

www.fas.ie 

www.job.ie

www.argus.ie

www.myjob.ie

Revenue office

www.revenue.ie

Safety 

www.garda.ie

Irish Newspapers 

www.independent.ie 

www.ireland.com 

www.irishtimes.com

www.independent.ie 

www.irishexaminer.com 

Travel in Ireland

www.discoverireland.com/ire

Irish Council for International Students

www.internationalstudents.ie 

Link to University websites In Ireland For International Students

Trinity College Of Trinity

University College Dublin

University College Cork

Dublin City University

Technological University Dublin

University Of Limerick

Maynooth University

Galway National University Of Ireland

Athlone Institute Of Technology

Carlow Technology Institute

Dundalk Technology Institute

Limerick Institute Of Technology

Letterkenny Institute Of Technology

Waterford Institute Of Technology

Cork Institute Of Technology

Sligo Technology Institute

Institute Of Technology, Tralee

Dublin Business School

Griffith College Dublin

Useful articles for international students

Study in Ireland: A Guide for International Students

International Students

Student visas to study in Ireland

Study in Ireland

Top recommended websites for international students 

Irish Council for International Students

Irish Universities Association

Citizens Information

Education in Ireland

Embassy World

The Irish Naturalisation & Immigration Service

Google Maps

 

Happy Tenants – The Importance Of Having Great Tenants

apartment roomates

The tenants you choose have a significant effect on the success of the investment property you manage or own. Read our guide to learn more about the steps you can take to maintain a happy and positive relationship with your tenants.

Introduction

Many of us have experienced the financial burden and time spent resolving bad tenancies. For those agents and homeowners who are lucky to avoid this, there are ways to minimise the risk of it occurring. There are many quality tenants out there, but it can take patience to find them. If you take extra consideration to search for and choose the right tenant now, you can save time and alleviate stress in the future.

Statistics

In May 2019, Ireland reported its lowest rental housing availability of all time. Housing Europe report that the trends are similar across the EU. As tough as this is, this means the odds are in your favour to choose the best tenants as there is no shortage. Our guide below outlines what the ideal tenant is, why they are important, and how to find them.

 

man working at home with pet dog

What is the ideal tenant?

For many, an ideal tenant is one who respects the property and consistently pays the rent on time. This is an excellent start, but what about landing those top-quality tenants that give you complete peace of mind? These are the tenants that make the property a worthy and stress-free investment, and the ones we have valuable, uncomplicated and rewarding relationships with. These are the ‘Happy Tenants’. They exist and are looking to rent a home. The secret to finding these tenants is looking for candidates that really suit the property.

 

The Happy Tenant: who are they?

A Happy Tenant is the right tenant for the right property. This extends beyond the textbook description of a tenant that follows the law as set out by your governing legislation. A happy tenant is someone who has a good quality of life with the property they live in as a contributing factor. 

 

Consider this scenario

You have an applicant named John, he has a perfect rental history, excellent references and the rent cost is only 30% of his salary. He also has a large pet dog, but his references specify that as an upstanding tenant, there have not been any issues. John has applied for a property 1.5 hours commute from his work without a backyard. 

 

As an agent/homeowner, you are looking for an excellent tenant for a long-term tenancy of ideally a minimum of 4 years.

 

Is there a risk?

John certainly sounds like a top candidate with a rental history and the income to demonstrate he can pay the rent and look after the property. But is he the most suitable? There are many variables to consider when finding the right tenant. In this case, you are looking for someone in the long term. Someone who needs to travel 3 hours every day for work and owns a large dog is not the best tenant for this property without a backyard. Will this lifestyle keep him happy? There is a risk that John might not stay in the property for long when you consider the physiological and psychological needs of humans and pets.

Ideal tenant

The ideal tenant can be anyone; they can have pets, they can be a first-time renter, students, working professionals, families etc. A pet owner could be a perfect tenant, as having a pet takes responsibility and they are likely looking for a long term home It comes down to whether they want to and can make a home in the property. We will explore why this is important below.

 

Why do Happy Tenants make a difference?

“We have to be ahead of the game as far as possible in thinking about the happiness of tenants. In the end, they pay the rent and we want to find the highest rent and the most loyal tenant in the long term.” Emerging Trends in Real Estate®: Europe 2019 – pwc.com. 

 

It is true, the right tenant can make a major difference to how the tenancy carries out, and how the investment performs. Just like a satisfied worker who loves their job, a happy tenant is someone who respects their environment and will go beyond the basic requirements to maintain, preserve and improve it. This is the difference between the people that consider their rental a property, and others who consider it a home.  Here’s a closer look at some of the benefits of ideal tenants:

 

Longer-term tenancies

Re-letting a property is time-consuming and costly. Long term tenancies minimise the time and costs involved in managing vacates, and the surprises that may come with them. They also lessen advertising and re-letting costs, along with the downtime from the property being vacant. As a result, long term tenants provide sustained financial security for the homeowner. In addition, minimal turnaround reduces the risk of bad tenants, and wear and tear caused by regular move-ins/outs.

 

Property Maintenance & Upkeep 

Tenants who see their rental as a home share a common interest with agents and homeowners to maintain the property. This means reporting maintenance issues in a timely manner before they escalate into something that will cause a higher financial burden.


Stronger relationships

A good relationship results in cognitive trust, respect and practical communication. Overall, it makes the whole rental partnership easier. If you have a strong relationship with your tenant, contractual needs and etiquette will be mutually enforced and respected.

 

In summary, finding the right tenant will save you time, money and hassle. Not only will it make your life easier, but it will have an invaluable impact on the life of the tenant.

 

How do you find Happy Tenants?

You have the power to find the right tenant when leasing a property. A tenant CV will help you determine what an applicant is looking for, or you can ask questions. You need to determine whether the property you are leasing matches the needs of the potential tenant. Some questions you may want to consider:

 

  • Are there any specific amenities they require?
  • Are there any specific attributes they are looking for in a property? E.g. Do they need a backyard or secured garage? 
  • Can you accommodate for any of the things they need that you don’t currently have on offer?
  • How close is their workplace? Will they have a long commute?

Find a suitable solution

Targeting multitudes of candidates is counter-productive when you consider the amount of time it takes filtering through applications to find the best one. You could instead save time and find someone that is most suitable by reading their tenant CV. Another way for agencies to find great tenants in the area is to form relationships with local businesses; word of mouth and referrals are effective ways to find interest locally. 

 

How to figure out tenant suitability

A great indicator of tenant suitability is to find out how close the property is to someone’s workplace. Let’s revisit our applicant John: John has submitted a tenant CV, his CV specifies that he currently has a large dog, but it is going back to his ex-wife in a month. It also states that although his office is located in the city, he works remotely and is looking for somewhere further out of town to suit his lifestyle.

 

Suddenly, with a little more information John seems like a very suitable tenant. Thanks to John’s tenant CV and your extra effort to search for information, you have found someone that is an excellent fit and is likely to stay for the long term. 

 

Result

A tenant that makes the effort to put together a CV shows that they care about finding their ideal home. It shows they are responsible and accommodating as they have taken action to make your life easier by providing you with the information you need. If they provide references that are already verified by a third party, this is a useful indication of whether they are trustworthy and organised. It is difficult to truly know what type of tenant someone will be from an application form; so reading a CV can help verify a candidate’s needs and whether they are suitable.

 

Click here to start browsing tenant CVs today.

Key Takeaways: Happy Tenants

Agents and homeowners have a difficult job in managing properties, but they have the capacity to make it easier. This can be done if you find a Happy Tenant that loves coming home to your property and treats it as their own. It’s business – According to Forbes and many business leaders, becoming more customer-focused leads to a profitable organisation. If you take a professional and empathetic approach to tenant needs you can develop a loyal, successful and long-term relationship.

 

Requesting Tenant CVs is the smartest way to find great tenants – Find out why!

 

References

6 Reasons to Use A Tenant CV

landlord signing agreement

Struggling to find a home in today’s competitive rental market? In this guide, we will show you why using a Tenant CV will give your a competitive edge over other applicants.

 

Finding a new home can be as important as scoring your dream job. It’s your base where you go to unwind, recharge your batteries and steel yourself to take on the world outside. Your home is your sanctuary where you should feel safe and where memories are made and shared. It is a representation of you. You deserve a big say in where you are going to live! So how can you influence where you live and avoid wasting time on tenant application forms for properties that don’t suit you?

 

Take control with a  Tenant CV that will help you put your best self forward, get noticed and secure the dream home that will suit your lifestyle. 

 

A good Tenant CV is a profile that expresses your attributes when searching for a new home and promotes you as a suitable tenant. A great Tenant CV goes further by including your particular requirements in a home. This takes some frustration out of the rental application process. Providing all useful and essential information for the homeowner upfront. while also outlining your own needs.

 

Many of us are familiar with the famous quote “By failing to prepare, you are preparing to fail.”.  Here are our top 6 reasons to prepare yourself for a competitive rental market with a Tenant CV. One that that best reflects you and what you need in a home.

 

tenant-cv-rental-application-new-home

 

6 Ways A Tenant CV Can Aid Your House-Hunting

1. Define Your Needs

If you don’t want to join the 59% of people that find it difficult to find a suitable home, you can start by reflecting on and defining your needs. By identifying what is most important to you, you can skip the frustration and waste of time on pointless viewings. Ask yourself questions, do you want to be close to work? Do you need a garden? Are there any amenities that are essential to you?; and then make it known on your Tenant CV. If something really is important to you then make it clear. Great homeowners value long term tenancies with good tenants and if they can accommodate you, more often than not they will.

 

2. Express Yourself & Stand Out

Once you have defined your criteria for a home, it’s time to show the agents and homeowners why you are the best candidate. A Tenant CV simply puts more power in your hands. It enables you to present yourself beyond the restraints of a standard tenant application. A profile of yourself with your living objectives will convey your individuality. It helps the reader understand what type of tenant you are likely to be. If you’re comfortable with it and you’re using an online Tenant CV tool, include a short video to showcase your personality. 

 

Homeowners look for evidence they can trust the people renting their property.  An impressive Tenant CV is your best opportunity to present your evidence and separate yourself from the crowd, so you get selected ahead of your competition.

 

3. Demonstrate Trustworthiness & Organisation Skills 

For homeowners and letting agents, the top priority is to find someone who is going to look after the property and pay the rent reliably on time. According to a survey conducted by DKM Consultants in 2014 for the RTB, some primary reasons agents choose not to rent to tenants in Ireland are because they are worried about property damage, rent being paid on time, or they don’t trust the applicant. Selecting the right tenant has a lot to do with human nature and finding reasons to like somebody. 

 

Preparing a great Tenant CV allows you to demonstrate that you are an organised responsible person by answering key questions and providing relevant information. Not only can a resume showcase your ability to care for a property, but it can also demonstrate your ability to pay.  Paying bills on time and maintaining order requires you to be on top of things. What’s more, you can also include any written references in your Tenant CV.

 

4. Address Potential Doubts About Your Tenant Application

Have you ever been in a situation where you feel an explanation will help people to understand you, but you don’t have the chance to get your point across? A Tenant CV is a means to explain things that might otherwise be perceived as negative in your application. Some examples are changing jobs, relocating often, or perhaps being a first-time renter. Being a first-time renter can be a positive thing, as it’s your chance to kick-start an excellent rental history.  The Tenant CV is a great tool to explain peculiarities like this in your objectives to a potential homeowner.

 

5. Save Time

Oftentimes homeowners and agents will invite the first 20 ad respondents to a property Viewing. You need to be fast if a great property pops up on a property website. Having all your key information on hand will help to submit an application ASAP!

 

A Tenant CV prepared in advance greatly simplifies and accelerates this process. Usually, homeowners are happy to accept a good tenant CV, as long as the information is true and the references stack up. You can shine even further by including pre-written references and getting your identity independently verified in advance. This will reduce time on tenant background checks and increase your chances of being selected. Make the landlord or agent job easier when it comes to narrowing down applications and they will look kindly on you.

 

In addition to streamlining the application process, outlining your wants and needs in a home on your Tenant CV means that you can save time viewing unsuitable properties. 

 

6. Turn Competition Into An Opportunity

It’s no secret that house and apartment hunting can be competitive, but considering the above, you can use competition to your advantage! You just need to take the initiative to put yourself on top. Whether you’re a 1st time, or 10th-time renter, being prepared and taking measures to stand out will help establish yourself as an impressive candidate. It’s like applying for that dream job if you’re proactive and go above and beyond; you should validate why you should be chosen. 

 

landlord signing agreement

Tenant CVs: The Key Takeaways

In this guide, we have looked at how rental resumes allow you to define your needs, express yourself, demonstrate trustworthiness, explain doubts, save time and get ahead of the competition. It’s clear that a Tenant CV is a tool that will give you a competitive edge when searching for your new home.

 

Like practising for a job interview, those that are prepared are more likely to succeed than those that aren’t. There’s no doubt that securing viewings or a lease can be challenging; but by having a Tenant CV on hand, you can be more prepared than others. A strong Tenant CV will impress agents and homeowners and ensure you stand out in a pile of applications. 

 

The sooner you find a home that’s right for you, the sooner you can start living and be happy!

 

 

 

References: